Bedlington
 


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Manchester 17
Manchester 17 Judge
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Crufts 17 Judge
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National Terrier 17 Judge
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WELKS 17 Judge
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Birmingham National 17 Judge
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SKC May 17 Judge
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Leeds 17 Judge
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Paignton 17 Judge
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Bournemouth 17 Judge
Welsh Kennel Club 17

Welsh Kennel Club 17 Judge
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SKC August 17 Judge
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City Of Birmingham 17 Judge
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Richmond Dog 17 Judge
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Darlington 17 Judge
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Belfast 17 Judge
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Driffield 17 Judge
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South Wales 17 Judge
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Midland Counties 17 Judge
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LKA 17 Judge

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The Bedlington Terrier

The famed progenitor of Bedlington was a dog named "Old Flint", whelped in 1782 and owned by "Squire Trevelyan." Originally, the breed was known as the "Rothbury" or "Rodbery Terrier." This name derived from a famous bitch brought from Staffordshire by a company of nail makers who settled in Rothbury. The Terriers of this section were accustomed to rodent hunting underground, and worked with packs of foxhounds kept there at the time.
It is suggested that the Bedlington may well have made its way to Ireland and played a part in the early development of the Kerry Blue Terrier.
The first Bedlington Terrier club was formed in 1877. The Bedlington Terrier was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1948.
The Bedlington Terrier is often described as looking like a lamb on a leash, probably because it has non-shedding fur with a woolly texture. These dogs may be blue, sandy, or liver, and can be solid colours or have tan markings. These become paler as the dog grows older.
This breed has a wedge-shaped head with sparkling eyes. Although it looks meek when reclining on the couch, the Bedlington Terrier is argumentative and every inch a terrier when aroused. Its body shape, however, is unusual for a terrier, being somewhat like a Greyhound or Whippet in construction, which enables it to gallop at great speed. However, the front legs are constructed differently from those quick hounds in that the front legs are closer together at the feet than at the elbows. This enables a Bedlington Terrier to turn or pivot quickly when chasing quarry at high speed. "Gait/Movement the Bedlington is Capable of galloping at high speed and have appearance of being able to do so. Action very distinctive, rather mincing, light and springy in slower paces and slight roll when in full stride."Bedlington Terriers are groomed with patches of fur on their heads and ears. This practice is thought to have originated when the Bedlington was used to hunt rats. The rats, trying to escape, would bite at the dog's ears or tail, saving them from an injury and possible death from an infection. A similar idea is seen in the tail, crest and wings of the Secretary Bird
These do-all dogs were able to do almost anything asked of them, if in classic terrier manner. In contrast to its placid appearance, Bedlingtons would have to be able hold its own when pitted in dog fighting contests and was particularly well known to fight to the death when set upon. In addition, it was fast enough to bay a badger or a fox and was a first-rate water dog.


 

A Bedlington Fit For Purpose

 

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Bedlington Breed Standard