Glen Of Imaal
 


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Manchester 17
Manchester 17 Judge
Crufts 17
Crufts 17 Judge
National Terrier 17
National Terrier 17 Judge
WELKS 17
WELKS 17 Judge
Birmingham National 17
Birmingham National 17 Judge
SKC May 17
SKC May 17 Judge
Bath 17
Bath 17 Judge
Southern Counties 17
Southern Counties 17 Judge
Blackpool 17
Blackpool 17 Judge
Windsor 17
Windsor 17 Judge
Leeds 17
Leeds 17 Judge
Welsh Kennel Club 17
Welsh Kennel Club 17 Judge
Darlington 17
Darlington 17 Judge
Belfast 17
Belfast 17 Judge
South Wales 17
South Wales 17 Judge
Midland Counties 17
Midland Counties 17 Judge
LKA 17
LKA 17 Judge


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The Glen of Imaal Terrier

The Glen of Imaal Terrier is a breed of dog of the terrier category. It originates in Wicklow, Ireland, and was developed as a working terrier, proficient in badger-baiting and hunting of fox.The Glen of Imaal Terrier, though normally docile, can sometimes be dog-aggressive if provoked. There have been no reported serious injuries caused by the breed, but their hunting background is visible in some of the dogs. This means that some Glens have a high prey drive and might mistake domestic pets for prey (e.g., cats, rats, gerbils, etc.)
The Glen of Imaal is classified as a medium-sized dog. When full grown, the average Glen of Imaal weighs approximately 16 kg (35 lbs) and stands 35.5 cm (14 in) tall at the withers. The breed has a medium-length coat that is usually wheaten, blue, or brindle in color.
The Glen of Imaal Terrier was initially bred to rid the home and farm of vermin, and hunt fox and badger. The European badger weighs in at 40 lbs and the Glen was tough and strong enough to go to ground and dispatch the vermin soundlessly.
According to legend the Glen of Imaal also has a unique task which it was expressly designed for: it was a turnspit dog. The turnspit was a large wheel which, when paddled by the dog, would turn the spit over the hearth--a canine-propelled rotisserie, if you will. The Glen’s highly individualized bowed front legs and powerful hindquarters were ideally suited for this. For several hundred years, these hearty dogs performed their tasks unnoticed by all except those who treasured them. With the advent of dog shows in the 20th century, the breed began to emerge into the public eye. In 1934, the Glen of Imaal Terrier was given full recognition by the Irish Kennel Club. It was the third of the four Irish terrier breeds to be so acknowledged. The breed is now recognized by the Kennel Club of Great Britain, FCI, and several rare breed associations. In America the Glen was fully recognized and entered the Terrier Group in October 2004 though the hard efforts of members of the Glen of Imaal Terrier Club of America. There are 500-600 Glens registered in the United States.
The Glen is a big dog on short legs. It stands up to 14" at the withers (the point where the neck meets the back) and weighs between 32-40 lbs. It should always give the impression of great substance for its size. Longer than tall, it carries a double coat: a harsher outer coat and a soft under coat. The topknot and furnishings are softer. Its front legs are bowed--like Chippendale furniture -- with front feet pointing to 10 and 2 o’clock.turning . Its ears are rose or semi-prick when alert. Its unique topline rises to a strong loin, with no dip or slackness behind the withers and no drop-off at the croup. The hindquarters are extraordinarily well-muscled. The docked tail is set high and carried erect. Accepted colors are wheaten (any shade), blue, and brindle, the most commonly seen being blue brindle, (the most desirable being a bleu brindle a mixture of dark-slate blue, lighter blue undercoat and hints of tan.

Breed Clubs and Societies

The Glen of Imaal Terrier Association. Contact: Mrs A Hardy. Tel No: 01777 703417

Glen of Imaal Terrier Enthusiasts & Fanciers Club (EFG) Secretary: Jean Rogers jean@e-f-g.co.uk


This breed of dog is a 'Vulnerable Native Breed'


 

 

Glen Of Imaal Breed Standard